"Our eyes are full of terrible confessions."

Anne Sexton, from The Black Art (via violentwavesofemotion)

invisiblelad:

perpetual reblogging

Vincent  van Gogh - From ‘Almond Blossoms’ Series (1888-1890)

anomaly1:

I’m actually disappointed that Bill Nyes face can’t get more unapproving

anomaly1:

I’m actually disappointed that Bill Nyes face can’t get more unapproving

"I can handle it,
I can handle anything,
if it’s all for you."

"I love coffee. I sometimes get excited at night thinking of the coffee I’ll get to drink in the morning. Coffee is reason to wake up. There are other reasons, of course. But coffee is the incentive, at the very least."

Annie Clark (via sufjand)
Jambo the Pygmy Falcon (by Penny Hyde)

Jambo the Pygmy Falcon (by Penny Hyde)

"Love crosses its islands, from grief to grief,
it sets its roots, watered with tears,
and no one––no one––can escape the heart’s progress
as it runs, silent and carnivorous."

Pablo Neruda, from “Love Crosses its Islands”, translated by Stephen Tapscott (via hiddenshores)

generalelectric:

At GE Global Research, a tube of almost pure quartz is heated to temperatures of around 1,700 degrees Celsius to create custom laboratory glassware. The material is then molded and tailored specifically to the experiment it’s being created for.

brazilia:

الفنان ” Bryan Lewis Saunders “

ينقل تجربته  برسمه لمجموعة من الرسوم التي تمثّله بعد تعاطيه انواع مختلفة من المخدرات .

Bryan Lewis Saunders is an artist from Johnson City, Tennessee who’s  doing a series of self portraits under the influence of various drugs.

sixpenceee:

PREHISTORIC SHARK: MEGALODON

Megalodon is an extinct species of shark that lived 1.5 million years ago and as you can probably tell from the above pictures it was HUGE, here are some few facts

  • It’s teeth were over 7 inches long
  • It’s bite can deliver from 10.2-18.6 tons of force, enough to crush a prehistoric whale’s skull like a grape
  • It feasted on prehistoric whales, dolphins, squids, fish, and even giant turtles 
  • It’s fossils have been found all over the world
  • No one knows why it went extinct

SOURCE


Wassily Kandinsky, “Tanzkurven: Zu den Tänzen der Palucca,” Das Kunstblatt, Potsdam, vol. 10, no. 3 (1926)

Wassily Kandinsky, “Tanzkurven: Zu den Tänzen der Palucca,” Das Kunstblatt, Potsdam, vol. 10, no. 3 (1926)